Interview with Panthia Locklear

May 7, 2010

Interview with Panthia Locklear who is a teacher at the Odum Home Question: Can you give us some history of the Odum Home? Answer: The Odum Home was originally meant for all kids that didn’t have parents. Now its for … Continued

Shane Locklear #8

May 7, 2010

This week we read David E. Wilkins Breaking into the Intergovernmental Matrix: The Lumbee tribes efforts to secure federal acknowledgement. In this article Wilkins discusses the concept of being politically recognized by the federal and state government. This recognition is … Continued

Chris Burris #8

April 28, 2010

David E. Wilkins’ article “Breaking Into the Intergovernmental Matrix:  The Lumbee Tribe’s Efforts to Secure Federal Acknowledgement” investigates the Lumbee tribe’s attempts to gain federal recognition and the concurrent federal benefits by examining both the Lumbee’s motivations and the major … Continued

Shane Locklear #7

April 20, 2010

The readings for this week are from Christopher Arris Oakley’s “When Carolina Indians Went on the Warpath” The Media, the Klan, and the Lumbees of North Carolina. This essay describes the riot in Maxton after the KKK attempted to gather … Continued

Chris Burris #7

April 13, 2010

In his 2008 article “When Carolina Indians Went on the Warpath: The Media, the Klan, and the Lumbees of North Carolina”, published in Southern Cultures, Christopher Arris Oakley discusses the infamous “Maxton Riot” near Hayes Pond in Maxton.  This incident … Continued

Shane Locklear #2

March 30, 2010

Shifting Boundaries of Race and Ethnicity: Indian-Black Intermarriage in Southern New England, 1760-1880 by Daniel R. Mandell is an elaborate look into the lives of Indians in southern New England during the 18th century. As Mandell cultivates this insight he … Continued

Coty Brayboy Reponse #6

March 23, 2010

In Malinda Maynor Lowerys’ new book Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation: Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South, she examines how the Indians of Robeson County (Lumbee and Tuscarora today) react both within the community and with … Continued

Kristen Gnau #6

March 23, 2010

This week’s reading was from Dr. Malinda Maynor Lowery’s (newly released!) Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South.  In the preface, she introduces the book as a look at how Lumbee Identity has been formed over time.  This formation of … Continued

Shane Locklear- Response #6

March 23, 2010

The readings for this week were the preface and introduction of Malinda Maynor Lowerys’ book Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation: Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South. The book explains how the Indians of Robeson County, North … Continued

Kasey Oxendine #6

March 23, 2010

Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South By Malinda Maynor Lowery In her book Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South, Dr. Malinda Maynor Lowery explores how the identities of the Lumbee Indians of Robeson County were shaped in Robeson … Continued