Skip to main content

Julia Kaminer #1

January 26, 2010

Reflection on the Smith, Kelton, Davis Jr., Hahn, Rountree and Knick essays. The first five essays for this week, the Smith, Kelton, Davis Jr., Hahn and Rountree essays from the book, The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians 1540-1760, give a … Continued

Chris Burris #1

January 26, 2010

This week’s reading from The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians 1540-1760 addresses multiple topics in post-European contact history of the numerous Native American tribes of the Southeast, primarily regarding the area comprised of modern-day Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina, … Continued

Brayboy #1

January 26, 2010

Coty Lamar Brayboy The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760 Robbie Ethridge and Charles Hudson, Eds. The readings from The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians assigned this week broadly focused on the “flurry of movements” (13), not only of people … Continued

Bauer #1

January 26, 2010

“The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760”Robbie Ethridge and Charles Hudson, ed. The essays in “The Transformation” focus on the question of what historical forces, trends, and events caused the formation of the Indians of the colonial Southeast.  In addition, … Continued

Walker Elliott-Weekly Reflection#1

January 26, 2010

This week’s assigned readings—five essays from The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians and Knick’s “Because it is Right”—mainly address the early post-contact history of Southeastern Indian groups. All six sources rely heavily on archeological information, but the five essays from … Continued

Kasey Oxendine #1

January 26, 2010

Because It Is Right by Stanley Knick As the largest tribe east of the Mississippi River the Lumbee’s are still struggling for federal recognition. The have been recognized by the state since 1885. Congress recognized them in 1956 and terminated … Continued